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Home
Page


Starting
Off


Halls
Creek


Bungle
Bungles


Geikie
Gorge


Broome

Derby

Windjana
Gorge


Manning
Gorge


Jacks
Water
Hole


Wyndham

Ord
River


Kununurra

Homeward

Grand
Finale

- Halls Creek -

Approximately one thousand five hundred kilometres out from Alice Springs we cross the state border from the Northern Territory into Western Australia - and into a new time zone.....

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The area which we will now be exploring is shown on the map (above). The other map (top) demonstrates how the region is placed in relation to the rest of Western Australia.
The map (below) shows the route taken by our tour through the far north east of Western Australia.(Right clicking on this map and choosing 'zoom in' from the drop-down table will make it easier to read!)
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Entering by the Duncan Highway, a continuation of the Buchanan Highway, arrowed on the map as the road to Darwin (lower right) we visit the China Wall before entering Halls Creek for lunch.
After a hazardous journey to the Purnulu National Park the next two nights are spent in the Bungle Bungles. Then, after returning to Halls Creek, we move on to Broome (see the small maps top) for two nights.
Over the next six days our journey takes us to Derby, along the Gibb River Road (see the large map above) to Wyndham and and on to Kununurra.
After two nights in Kununurra (visiting Lake Argyle and the Ord River) we move on to Katherine (in the Northern Territory) and return along the Stuart Highway via Tennant Creek and the Devils Marbles to Alice Springs.

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This truly forbidding sign (right) in Halls Creek.....

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...doesn't deter tour members from enjoying a pleasant lunch in the park.

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The China Wall is situated several kilometres out of Halls Creek. This natural phenomenon projects above the surrounding rocks to form a white stone wall made of quartz. Originally the quartz formed a vein in the enclosing sandstone but, being harder and more resistant it withstood the weathering and erosion occuring in the adjacent sandstone. The wall winds its way over the surrounding hills and gives the appearance of a miniature Great Wall of China from whence it derives its name.

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Visitors can easily approach this part of the wall from the Duncan Highway which runs south-eastwards out of Halls Creek. The turn off is signposted about 2km from the town.

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