- WEYREGG PART 5 -

Visit to D'Brennerin Schnaps Distillery

LINKS to pages in the Weyregg site and to the Colin Day Travelling Days series:

1 : Weyregg Hotel and Lake
2 : Barbecue
3 : Folklore Music and Dance
4 : Boat Ride on Attersee
5 : Schnaps Distillery
6 : Gasthaus Bacchus
HOME PAGE : AUSTRIA 2009
HOME PAGE : COLIN DAY'S LINKS
HOME PAGE : LIST-O-LINKS FULL INDEX

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In Austria and many parts of Germany, especially in Bavaria, the tradition of raising a Maypole (Maibaum) on May 1 still serves to welcome spring as it has since ancient times. Similar Maypole festivities also can be found in England, Finland, Sweden, and the Czech Republic.

A Maypole is a tall wooden pole made from a tree trunk (pine or birch), with colorful ribbons, flowers, carved figures, and various other decorations adorning it, depending on the location. Germans placa a small pine tree at the top of the Maypole, which is usually set up in a town's public square or village green. Traditional dances, music, and folk customs are often associated with the Maypole. In small towns virtually the entire population turns out for the ceremonial raising of the Maypole and the festivities that follow.

German Schnaps is clear, colorless, and has a light fruit flavor. It is distilled from fermented fruit, is bottled with no added sugar, and normally contains about 40% ABV (80 proof). Its appearance and taste are the same as that of eau-de-vie, but this French term is seldom used in German-speaking countries. In Austria, Switzerland, and southern Germany, these beverages are commonly called Obstler (from the German Obst, fruit). Obstler are associated with the southern part of the German language area; equivalent beverages exist all over central and southeastern Europe. In northern Germany, almost all traditional distilled beverages are grain-based.

The main kinds of fruit used for German Schnaps are apples, pears, plums, and cherries, listed here in order from the least expensive to the most. Apricot is another popular fruit that is often used in Austrian Schnaps (Marillenschnaps). Fruits other than these five kinds are rarely used for German Schnaps.

Apples are usually used together with pears for Obstwasser; pears alone are used to produce Williamsbirne. Plums make Zwetschgenwasser, and cherries make Kirschwasser.

A raspberry-flavored spirit called Himbeergeist is also a Schnaps, although it is not produced by means of fermenting raspberries, which produce a low yield of alcohol due to their low sugar content. Instead, alcohol is infused with fresh raspberries, and this mixture is then distilled.

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Just across the road from the Weyregg Maypole is the local Schnaps distillery owned and run by Rosi Huber and trading under the name of 'D'Brennerin'.

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The garden contains numerous metal 'sculptures' some of which are pictured left and below.


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The entrance to the distillery (below).


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Tasting and salesroom (left) .......

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..... and the distillers (left and right) !!

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